ALL ABOARD THE OMNIBUS

A collection of facts and minutiae by Sarah of Super Music.
scribnerbooks:

Steve Martin’s business card.

scribnerbooks:

Steve Martin’s business card.

Aerial photo of Manhattan taken from a 360° screengrab.

Aerial photo of Manhattan taken from a 360° screengrab.

I think “career” is often an artificial and unsustainable construct. It suffers from the same unreality as our view of the economy. That there can be an endlessly expanding economy strikes me as foolish, as does the notion of a career as an endless ladder up.
What matters are the concrete things you’re doing in your life today.

-Cary Tennis.

"Since You Asked" by Cary Tennis for Salon, 7/2/12.

Gone to Texas.

I love old expressions like this:

"[The] phrase ‘Gone to Texas,’ … originated in America during the 19th century frontier times when debtors or the disenfranchised would leave town in pursuit of a new life in the still unsettled region of Texas. Those dissidents would usually put a sign on their home that said, ‘Gone to Texas’ or ‘G.T.T., implying, essentially: ‘I’m starting over as someone else –- leave me alone!’"

From an entirely unrelated post on Lana Del Rey by Stereogum.

“It is not our job to protect the people from the consequences of their political choices.”

- Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts.

"Supreme Court Lets Health Law Largely Stand." By Adam Liptak and John H. Cushman, Jr. for The New York Times. 6/28/12.

Cover art from Dennis Wilson’sPacific Ocean Blue, released in 1977 on Caribou.
It was the first solo album from a member of The Beach Boys, and it received substantial critical praise.
Wilson died six years later from drowning at Marina del Rey.

Cover art from Dennis Wilson’sPacific Ocean Blue, released in 1977 on Caribou.

It was the first solo album from a member of The Beach Boys, and it received substantial critical praise.

Wilson died six years later from drowning at Marina del Rey.

The cover of The Everly Brother’s 1968 LP “Roots,” released on Warner Bros.
Via Wikipedia: In his reviews of the bands subsequent albums, critic Robert Christgau often utilized Roots as a touchstone, referring to it as “sweet”, “thoughtful, even-tempered, and unique” and insisting that it was the last album the duo made as a “vital team” before they “lost it”.

The cover of The Everly Brother’s 1968 LP “Roots,” released on Warner Bros.

Via Wikipedia: In his reviews of the bands subsequent albums, critic Robert Christgau often utilized Roots as a touchstone, referring to it as “sweet”, “thoughtful, even-tempered, and unique” and insisting that it was the last album the duo made as a “vital team” before they “lost it”.

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act outside of the Supreme Court moments after the ruling came down.
Outside the court, a loud cheer goes up as word spreads that the health care law is largely upheld. Chants of “Yes We Can!” ring out as opponents are largely silent.
Stephen Crowley/The New York Times.

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act outside of the Supreme Court moments after the ruling came down.

Outside the court, a loud cheer goes up as word spreads that the health care law is largely upheld. Chants of “Yes We Can!” ring out as opponents are largely silent.

Stephen Crowley/The New York Times.

Henry McMaster, left, the former attorney general of South Carolina, and Alan Wilson, the state’s current attorney general, watch the announcement of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Columbia, S.C. Both Mr. McMaster and Mr. Wilson had been vocal opponents of the Affordable Care Act.
John W. Adkisson for The New York Times.

Henry McMaster, left, the former attorney general of South Carolina, and Alan Wilson, the state’s current attorney general, watch the announcement of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Columbia, S.C. Both Mr. McMaster and Mr. Wilson had been vocal opponents of the Affordable Care Act.

John W. Adkisson for The New York Times.

michaelswaney:

Fred Tomaselli, Night Music for Raptors, 2010. Photo collage, acrylic and resin on wood panel, 84 x 60 in. (213.4 x 152.4 cm)

michaelswaney:

Fred Tomaselli, Night Music for Raptors, 2010. Photo collage, acrylic and resin on wood panel, 84 x 60 in. (213.4 x 152.4 cm)